Spring Symposium Highlights MSU Undergraduate Research

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Contact person: Carl Smith

Kristieona Epting, a junior educational psychology student from Killeen, Texas, discusses her research, “Undergraduate Faculty Impressions of Pivot Teaching during the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Literature Review,” at the recent Undergraduate Faculty Research Symposium. cycle. The symposium judged nearly 200 faculty-led research projects and was part of Mississippi State’s inaugural Research Week. (Photo by Robby Lozano)

STARKVILLE, Mississippi – The State of Mississippi recently recognized student faculty-guided research efforts at the Spring Symposium on Undergraduate Research.

The two-day event was part of Mississippi State University’s inaugural Research Week and featured submissions from students representing colleges, departments, and research centers campus-wide.

Nearly 200 projects in four categories—arts and humanities; biological sciences and engineering; physical sciences and engineering; and Social Sciences – were judged and four sub-competitions were held: the Community Engagement Research Stream, the Public Health Research Competition, Theta Tau Engineering Tomorrow Builder Award, and the Three-Minute Thesis Competition. Approximately 72 faculty members, postdoctoral associates and graduate students judged the undergraduate projects.

“The research symposium showcases undergraduate student research activities and allows the MSU community to celebrate their commitment and hard work,” said Anastasia Elder, Associate Dean of Shackouls Honors College and Director of Undergraduate Research. . “Participating in research is an exciting way for students to supplement their academic studies, satisfy their curiosity, and allow for deeper exploration in a field.”

The Shackouls Honors College is the main sponsor of the symposium, and other partners include the Center for Community-Engaged Learning, Graduate School, Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi, Office of Research and Economic Development, Office of the Provost and Executive Vice President and Student Association.

Undergraduates recognized in the research symposium include:

ARTS AND HUMANITIES THE BEST PROJECTS

Jacob Pritchard, Philosophy graduate from Memphis, Tennessee, for “Novus Miles Christi: Spiritual Authority and Suffering in the Presbyterian Missionary Movement”

Alysia Williams, Senior Architecture Graduate from Kennesaw, Georgia, for “Affordable Multifamily Housing in Relation to Community Revitalization and Social Development: A Cross-Analysis of Regional Housing in Urban Contexts”

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING THE BEST PROJECTS

Amber Cook, a Nesbit bioengineering major, for “The Conservation of Brain Folding Mechanics”

Reese Dunne, a mechanical engineering major from Starkville, for “A Diffusion Tensor Imaging Approach to Investigate the Effects of Exercise on Quadriceps Muscle Fiber Length”

Sophie Jones, a bioengineering major from Birmingham, Alabama, for “advancing methods for quantifying osteogenesis in static and dynamic culture”

Southaven Wildlife and Fisheries Science/Wildlife Science Specialist Catherine Paul, for “Are Barn Owls Potential Biological Control Agents for Rodents in the Black Belt?”

Ashutosh Shah, a senior mechanical engineer from Starkville, for “Identifying Invasive Aquatic Plant Species on Nvidia Jetson Nano Using Computer Vision and Deep Learning”

Nicholas Stinson, Brandon Biochemistry student, for “A method of quantifying neurodegeneration using a Drosophila model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1”

Gracie Teel, Nesbit Biochemistry major, for “Effects of dietary supplementation with DL-methionine and the calcium salt of DL-methionine hydroxide analog against diquat-induced oxidative stress in growing pigs”

THE BEST PROJECTS IN PHYSICAL SCIENCES AND ENGINEERING

Satsha Burden, an aerospace engineering major from Tupelo, for “Aerodynamics of Winglets”

Minjae Cho, a second-year mechanical engineering student from Starkville, for “Developing a Generative Adversarial Network Model for Multiphase Flow Prediction”

Devin Foeller, a senior aerospace engineer from Southaven, for “NMEA Communicator Integration for Flight Simulator Training”

Katelyn Woodard, chemical engineering graduate from Paducah, Kentucky, for “A Radical Library: Cataloging the Radiation Performance of Acrylates Under Electron Beam Curing”

Timothy Wunrow, Industrial Engineering graduate from Memphis, Tennessee, for “The Effect of Data Availability and Domain Adaptation for Part Certification in Metal-Based Additive Manufacturing”

THE BEST SOCIAL SCIENCES PROJECTS

Eleanor Holt, psychology graduate from Birmingham, Alabama, for “Parenting and Emerging Adult Sexual Health: The Impact of Parental Religiosity and Relationship Quality on Risky Sexual Behavior”

Anna McLain, educational psychology major at Hattiesburg, for “Evaluation of a Tiered System for Addressing Food Refusal in Adolescents”

Josie Nasekos, a young agricultural economics student from Clinton, to “Examine the Burden of Water Expenditures in the Southeastern United States”

Camden Patterson, junior psychology student at Southaven, for “You Are What You Keep: Community Assessment of the Relationship Between Hoarding Symptoms and Object Dependency”

Amy Pham, senior graduate in food science, nutrition and health promotion at Hattiesburg, for “The Relationship between Gender and Race and Body Image Dissatisfaction in Mississippi”

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT RESEARCH WINNERS

Joshua Warnsley, a senior industrial engineer from Decatur, for “The Link Between Community Socioeconomic Factors and the Expected Behavioral Response to Coming Climate Catastrophe”

Anna McLain, educational psychology major at Hattiesburg, for “Evaluation of a Tiered System for Addressing Food Refusal in Adolescents”

Sophie Jones, a bioengineering major from Birmingham, Alabama, for “advancing methods for quantifying osteogenesis in static and dynamic culture”

PUBLIC HEALTH RESEARCH COMPETITION WINNERS

FIRST—Erin Dickinson, Orchard Lake Senior Food Science and Dietetics graduate, for “Alcohol Use and Sleep Quality Among Mississippi State University Students”

SECOND—Emily Tucker, a biochemistry major from Vienna, Virginia, for “Survival and persistence of Listeria Monocytogenes Bug600 and ScottA after exposure to high and low concentrations of first-generation quaternary ammonium compound (benzalkonium chloride)”

THIRD—Rachel Kalchbrenner, Starkville Psychology graduate, for “Background Returns: Fragile Families and Early Teenage Substance Abuse”

THREE MINUTE THESIS COMPETITION

GRAND CHAMPION—Sarah Dulaney, a microbiology major from Vicksburg, for “Investigating differing attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccines within families”

MENTIONED—Satsha Burden, senior aerospace engineering graduate from Tupelo, for “Aerodynamics of Winglets”

PEOPLE’S CHOICE—Riley Cutler, BSc in Herndon, Virginia, for “Effects of Glyphosate on Recombination Plasticity in C. Elegans”

THETA TAU AWARD FOR BUILDING TOMORROW

Ashutosh Shah, a senior mechanical engineer from Starkville, for “Identifying Invasive Aquatic Plant Species on Nvidia Jetson Nano Using Computer Vision and Deep Learning”

To learn more about the Judy and Bobby Shackouls Honors College, visit www.honors.msstate.edu.

MSU is the main university in Mississippi, available online at www.msstate.edu.

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